CN Blackwater division
#91
Thanks for that info, Glen.  You're right about the 8 hatch reefers, as they were used by both CNR and CPR, so it's surprising that they'd ignore those Canadian icons (unless, of course, they couldn't acquire the rights to them).  I have one slab-side hopper, as they're among my favourite TH&B cars, but they're too modern for my layout's late '30s timeframe.  Mine was built from a Sylvan kit.
The stockcars are of interest to me, as the TH&B used them, although I was always under the impression that they simply removed every other board from a regular 36' Fowler boxcar, to convert them into stock cars.  I have several 40'-ers from various manufacturers, and am looking forward to pick-up 3 or 4 of the shorter cars.

Wayne
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#92
I've built a sylvan slab side hopper (In PGE scheme) and because I'm a glutton for punishment, there's another on my shelf to be started.
I've also built a westerfield fowler stockcar, both challenging and a bit of fun.
I assume that the tooling for True line's the Canadian specific rolling stock is still out there, I wouldn't mind to get a couple of the miniboxes if they ever surface.
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#93
(05-12-2021, 10:21 PM)cnrglen Wrote: I hear you. Spring finally came around here a month ago and the time in the workshop has gone down accordingly.

I've also been working on a true-line 8 hatch reefer:


Back-dating it's paint and decals and adding a charcoal heater

 

It's taken a month to get this far but it's almost finished.

How did you strip the paint off?  I have two TLT CNR Reefer in Maple leaf livery but the Grey paint is much too dark for my taste.  I would like to redo them in the right shade of Grey.
Guy from Southern Quebec.
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#94
Guy, for stripping paint off plastic, 99% alcohol, available at any drugstore should probably do the trick.  Another option which also works well on plastic is Super Clean.  It's available from Walmart, but there may be other sources, too.

I usually use a plastic container like this for alcohol or Super Clean....

   

...although it's sometimes difficult to find ones tall enough for passenger cars.  It's a good idea to keep the lid on the plastic containers, too, as it helps to limit evapouration and the chemical smells.  An old toothbrush is useful for getting the paint off in tight areas

Alcohol and Super Clean work on most paints, but not all of them.  Some modellers also use brake fluid, which often removes stubborn paints, but it can also severely damage some plastics - years ago, I use some on an Atlas switcher, and the body shell was distorted almost beyond recognition

If I'm stripping a metal item, such as a brass locomotive or one made of cast metal, alcohol and/or Super Clean work well, but another option is lacquer thinner.
Make sure that there are no plastic details, as the lacquer thinner will destroy them.  I use a canning jar with a screw-on top, as the thinner is quite volatile, and will not only evapourate if left uncapped, but will also stink-up the whole house....

   

Wayne
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#95
(06-14-2021, 08:47 PM)doctorwayne Wrote: Guy, for stripping paint off plastic, 99% alcohol, available at any drugstore should probably do the trick.  Another option which also works well on plastic is Super Clean.  It's available from Walmart, but there may be other sources, too.

I usually use a plastic container like this for alcohol or Super Clean....



...although it's sometimes difficult to find ones tall enough for passenger cars.  It's a good idea to keep the lid on the plastic containers, too, as it helps to limit evapouration and the chemical smells.  An old toothbrush is useful for getting the paint off in tight areas

Alcohol and Super Clean work on most paints, but not all of them.  Some modellers also use brake fluid, which often removes stubborn paints, but it can also severely damage some plastics - years ago, I use some on an Atlas switcher, and the body shell was distorted almost beyond recognition

If I'm stripping a metal item, such as a brass locomotive or one made of cast metal, alcohol and/or Super Clean work well, but another option is lacquer thinner.
Make sure that there are no plastic details, as the lacquer thinner will destroy them.  I use a canning jar with a screw-on top, as the thinner is quite volatile, and will not only evapourate if left uncapped, but will also stink-up the whole house....



Wayne

Thanks Wayne for the reply.  I already use 99% isopropyl alcohol for most of the paint stripping I have to do.  I was wondering if it worked on True Line Trains paints.  I’ll give it a try.
Guy from Southern Quebec.
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